Verbal or Written Communications are Not Always PrivateTechnical Surveillance Countermeasures, sometimes called TSCM Sweeps, debugging, wiretap detection or just plain old “sweeps”.  With the advent of cellphones, VOIP phones, computer Skype, FaceTime, go-to-meeting and the many other ways of communication, illegal eavesdropping has become easily available to those who are curious.  Google the internet for mobile phone bugging and you will find many “offshore” providers that sell highly sophisticated cell phone spy software for usually less than a hundred bucks.  Carefully read the advertising material posted on these sites and you will find that they guarantee that the spy on cell software can’t be found.  They provide a detailed tutorial explaining how to remotely install phone spying software on a target phone.  Electronic eavesdropping is illegal in the United States and many other countries, but so is stealing a car, and a car is stolen every 45 seconds in the US.   If a cell phone bug has been remotely installed on your phone, then the perpetrator can listen to your calls, see your contacts, text messages, emails, photos, videos and know where you are from the GPS location on your phone.   They can be secretly notified when you make or receive a call.   When your phone is in your pocket or purse, they can turn on the mike and hear the room conversations.  Our cellular forensic lab is one of a very few that can actually detect illegal spyware on your phone. It normally takes five or six days and if found, we can usually identify the perpetrator from the text notification number.  If you choose to prosecute the offender,

Our cellular forensic lab is one of a very few that can actually detect illegal spyware on your phone. It normally takes five or six days and if found, we can usually identify the perpetrator from the text notification number.  If you choose to prosecute the offender, It normally takes five or six days and if found, we can usually identify the perpetrator from the text notification number.  If you choose to prosecute the offender, it's recommended you employ an attorney to be your advocate in meeting with the U.S. Attorney, in your district, as this is happening to so many victims in the US they don’t have the staff to handle all the complaints.   You can also sue civilly for damages.  See PL 90-351, Title III, Chapter 18, USC 2510-2520.

~C. Tim Wilcox, CEO, International Investigators